Commentary on a passage from cry

The Prophet introduces a new subject; for, leaving the people on whom no favorable impression was made either by threatenings or by admonitions, on account of their desperate wickedness, he turns to posterity, in order to declare that the people who shall be humbled under the cross will experience no want of consolation even amidst the severest distresses. And it is probable that he wrote this prophecy when the time of the captivity was at hand, that he might not at his departure from life leave the Church of God overwhehned by very grievous calamities, without the hope of restoration. Though he formerly mingled his predictions with threatenings and terrors for this purpose, yet he appears to have contemplated chiefly the benefit of those who lived at that time.

Commentary on a passage from cry

Our passage begins with a striking picture.

Isaiah - "Cry loudly, do not - Verse-by-Verse Commentary

A fair and queenly woman stands in the crowded resorts of men, and lifts up a voice of sweet entreaty-authoritative as well as sweet.

Her name is Wisdom. The word is in the plural in the Hebrew, as if to teach that in this serene and lovely form all manifold wisdoms are gathered and made one.

Who then is she? It is clear that this book means Commentary on a passage from cry more by Wisdom than a human quality merely; for august and divine attributes are given to her, and she is the co-eternal associate of God Himself.

Dwelling in His bosom, she thence comes forth to inspire all human good deeds, to plead evermore with men, to enrich those who listen to her with choicest gifts. Intellectual clearness, moral goodness, religious devotion, are all combined in the idea of Wisdom as belonging to men.

The divine source of all, and the correspondence between the human and the divine nature, are taught in the residence of this personified Wisdom with God before she dwelt with men. The whole of the manifold revelations, by which God makes known any part of His will to men, are her voice.

Especially the call contained in the Old Testament revelation is the summons of Wisdom.

Commentary on a passage from cry

The first step in delivering men from evil-that is, from foolish-courses is to put very clearly before them the true character of their acts, and still more of their inclinations. Gracious offers and rich promises come after; but the initial message of Wisdom to such men as we are must be the accusation of folly.

That knowledge comes surely and soon enough without our seeking it. A man must have gone a long way down hill before he begins to gibe at virtue and godliness.

Commentary on a passage from cry

A great many very superior intellects, cultivated ladies and gentlemen, university graduates, and the like, would be unceremoniously set down by divine wisdom as fools; and surely if account is taken of the whole compass and duration of our being, and of all our relations to things and persons seen and unseen, nothing can be more stupid than godlessness, however cultured.

The word literally means coarse or thick, and may suggest the idea of stolid insensibility as the last stage in the downward progress.

But note that the charge is directed, not against deeds, but dispositions. Perverted love and perverted hatred underlie acts. You cannot love what you should loathe, without loathing what you should love.

Inner longings and revulsions settle character and acts. The divine Wisdom comes with a rod, but also with gifts; but if the rod is kissed, the rewards are possessed. The relation of clauses in Proverbs 1: If we turn at her reproof, two great gifts will be bestowed.

Her spirit within will make us quick to hear and receive her words sounding without. Outward revelation without prepared hearts is water spilt upon rock. Prepared hearts without a message to them would be but multiplication of vain longings; and God never stultifies Himself, or gives mouths without sending meat to fill them.

To the submissive spirit, there will not lack either disposition to hear or clear utterance of His will. But now comes a pause. Wisdom has made her offers in the crowded streets, and amid all the noise and bustle her voice has rung out. What is the result? Not a head has been turned, nor an eye lifted.

The bustle goes on as before.

For passages from the Fathers embodying this view, see references in Bishop Wordsworth on this chapter. even while it is true of Him that ‘He does not strive nor cry, nor cause His voice to be heard in the streets’; for the crying, which is denied to be His, is ostentatious and noisy, and the crying which is asserted to be hers is the. Psalm 88 English Standard Version (ESV) I Cry Out Day and Night Before You A Song. A Psalm of the Sons of Korah. To the choirmaster: according to Mahalath Leannoth. A Maskil [] of Heman the Ezrahite. David’s Song of Salvation (2 Samuel 22) His Cry for Help, and His Deliverance Bob is a pastor/teacher and elder at Community Bible Chapel in Richardson, Texas, and has contributed many of his Bible study series for use by the Foundation. Bob was born and raised in a Christian home i.

So, after the disappointed waiting of Wisdom, her voice peals out again, but this time with severity in its tones. Note how, in Proverbs 1: It does not need violent opposition or black crime to wreck a soul. Simply doing nothing when God speaks is enough to effect destruction.

There is no need to lift up angry arms in hostility. If we keep them hanging listless by our sides, it is sufficient. The gift escapes us, if we simply keep our hands shut or held behind our backs.

Alas, for ears which have not heard, for seeing eyes which have not seen because they loved evil simplicity and hated knowledge! Then note the terrible retribution.

That is an awful picture of the mocking laughter of Wisdom, accompanying the rush of the whirlwind and the groans of anguish and shrieks of terror.For passages from the Fathers embodying this view, see references in Bishop Wordsworth on this chapter. even while it is true of Him that ‘He does not strive nor cry, nor cause His voice to be heard in the streets’; for the crying, which is denied to be His, is ostentatious and noisy, and the crying which is asserted to be hers is the.

Dec 06,  · In these videos I'll be providing you with a full walkthrough and commentary for all story missions of Far Cry 3, in addition to checking out some of the side missions along the way.

Enjoy! Adam Clarke Commentary. Cry aloud, spare not - Never was a louder cry against the hypocrisy, nor a more cutting reproof of the wickedness, of a people professing a national established religion, having all the forms of godliness without a particle of its power.

This chapter has been often appointed to be read on political fast days for the success of . Cry, The Beloved Country Commentary Fear and Religion And now for all the people of Africa, the beloved caninariojana.com Sikelel’ iAfrika, God save Africa.

But he would not see that salvation. It lay afar off, because men were afraid of it. Because, to tell the truth, they were afraid of him, and his wife, and Msimangu, and the young demonstrator. The “cry” may or may not be uttered; it may express the anguish of the soul under dire and prolonged stress or burden and the lifting of perpetual petition in search of fulfillment, deliverance, or the answer to the riddles of life.

Bob Deffinbaugh. Robert L. (Bob)Deffinbaugh graduated from Dallas Theological Seminary with his Th.M. in Bob is a pastor/teacher and elder at Community Bible Chapel in Richardson, Texas, and has contributed many of his Bible study series for use by the Foundation.

The Stones Cry Out - Genesis 3 Exegetical Commentary